FAQ

Do I need a referral?


No you do not but to be reimbursed by your private insurance you may have to have one prior to starting treatment so you should check with your insurance company if you're not sure.



What is the sports medicine model of rehabilitation?

It is an active approach to the treatment of an injury. It involves frequent treatment in the early stages of the process with a focus on addressing all aspects of injury from decreasing pain and swelling to improving range of motion and strength to maintaining/improving cardiovascular conditioning. In this model the therapist, the client (you), your doctor and any other persons involved work together as a team to move your recovery as quickly as possible.



What should I expect on my first visit?


You should arrive on time for your first appointment and expect to have about 5-10 min of paper work to complete.  Next you'll be given a tour of the facility to orient you to the clinic and help make you feel more comfortable.  After that your therapist will start your assessment , which will include both talking with you about your injury and an objective assessment of the area. Your therapist will need to see the area of injury so if it's a lower body issue you should bring shorts to change into, and a t-shirt or tank top for an upper body issue.


After your assessment your therapist will outline what they found and how that relates to the symptoms you are having, then they will work with you to develop a treatment plan.  In total your first appointment with last about an hour to an hour and 15 min.



How often will I have to come?


This varies based on the individual but typically most clients come 3X/week for the first 2 weeks.  Dependent on your response to the treatment plan, further treatment will be decided on from there.



What's the difference in Athletic Therapy and Physiotherapy?

Physiotherapists and athletic therapists are both medical professionals who treat physical injuries. The primary goal of both physiotherapists and athletic therapists is to help clients return to pre-injury levels of physical activity. Physiotherapists have a broader education and scope of practice, and work with the general population and athletes but also may treat individuals with neurological and cardiovascular conditions. Athletic therapists work with athletes and the general population in treating musculoskeletal conditions and sports-related injuries.


Do I have to be an Athlete to see an Athletic Therapist?

No, Athletic Therapists treat a wide range of clients with musculoskeletal injuries, from injured workers, to those hurt in car accidents to everyday people with back pain.


Ken Val Rehab